IPA Review

Subscribe to IPA Review

January 2014 IPA Review now available!

  • IPA staff on the Dirty Dozen: Australia's worst opponents of freedom
  • Chris Berg on Capitalism in Ancient Rome
  • Stephanie Forrest on why the National Curriculum must be abolished
  • Matt Ridley and Julie Novak on why the world is getting better

...and much more. The IPA Review is available for purchase from our Melbourne office, by subscription, and from newsagencies across the country.

 

From the Editor: About the IPA Review

The IPA Review is Australia's oldest continuously published magazine covering politics and public affairs. The full archive of the IPA Review is available online by year:

1947 | 1948 | 1949 | 1950 | 1951 | 1952 | 1953 | 1954 | 1955 | 1956 | 1957 | 1958 | 1959 | 1960 | 1961 | 1962 | 1963 | 1964 | 1965 | 1966 | 1967 | 1968 | 1969 | 1970 | 1971 | 1972 | 1973 | 1974 | 1975 | 1976 | 1977 | 1978 | 1979 | 1980 | 1981 | 1982 | 1983 | 1984 | 1985 | 1986 | 1987 | 1988 | 1989 | 1990 | 1991 | 1992 | 1993 | 1994 | 1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998 | 1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010

In 1943, the Institute of Public Affairs, inspired by the success of its first policy paper Looking Forward, began publishing the IPA Review in order to address the political and policy issues of the day more fully. As George Coles, the chairman at the time, wrote in the first editorial, the "need and scope in Australia for a well-considered journal of opinion of this kind is abundantly apparent." The sixty-plus years that the IPA Review has been published has shown how correct that sentiment was.

Like many long running magazines, it has changed its emphasis a number of times, fluctuating between a journal of economic record and a popular magazine. It has also seen similar fluctations in its views on small number of policy areas - for instance, some aspects of social policy. In part, these shifts mirror broader changes on the liberal and conservative sides of Australian politics, as policy analysts and political activists have altered their visions of what constitutes a 'liberal' society over the last half-century. As Australian society has changed, so has the IPA Review.

But it is consistency that defines the IPA Review, not change. The IPA Review has long been a consistant advocate of the two core principles that distinguish it from its competitors in Australia's newagencies and in policy debate - a firm belief in the importance of economic freedom and the need to defend Australia's liberal democracy.

For those interested in sampling the long back-catalogue of the IPA Review, here are some particular articles that are of historical importance and enduring interest: