IPA Review Articles

A Conservative Titan
22 November 2013

A Conservative Titan

This article from the November 2013 edition of the IPA Review is written by Research Fellow at the IPA, Richard Allsop. British Conservative MP Jesse Norman has written an excellent book about Edmund Burke. It is a book in two parts, the first a reasonably straightforward biography of the subject and the second an analysis of his ideas, with a
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Dawn Of A New Class
22 November 2013

Dawn Of A New Class

This article from the November 2013 edition of the IPA Review is written by Development Coordinator at the IPA, Lydia Bevege. We can thank Charles Dickens for the way the term ‘Industrial Revolution’ brings to mind the image of a grimy-faced Oliver Twist or a hungry David Copperfield roaming the mean, dirty streets of London. In fact, Dickens’ portrayal of
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An Austere President
29 August 2013

An Austere President

This article from the Winter 2013 edition of the IPA Review is written by Perth-based writer, Kyle Kutasi. It’s a well-worn cliché that those who do not learn the lessons from history are doomed to repeat its mistakes. If the wrong lessons are drawn from previous events, then such mistakes are a certainty. It is therefore regrettable for us all that
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How Christians & Classical Liberals Defeated Slavery
24 August 2013

How Christians & Classical Liberals Defeated Slavery

This article from the Winter 2013 edition of the IPA Review is written by Director of Policy at the IPA, Chris Berg. Slavery is one of the biggest blights on human history. Its abolition is one of humanity’s greatest triumphs. But in our secular age it’s easy to forget one of the great drivers behind that triumph: how Christianity and free market
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Book Review: An Australian Ruling Class?
10 August 2013

Book Review: An Australian Ruling Class?

John Roskam reviews one of the most important books of 2013 In 1964 Donald Horne’s The Lucky Country was published. Horne had one basic argument—‘Australia is a lucky country, run mainly by second-rate people who share its luck.’ By the mid-1960s an emerging class of tertiary-educated professionals found a lot to like about Horne’s criticism of their country. This new
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The Government’s Guide To Australia Day
31 May 2013

The Government’s Guide To Australia Day

I’m not going to lie (a first for Strange Times?). But Australia Day troubles me. There’s something slightly creepy about how our government gives a taxpayer funded pat on the head to the very best number one citizen for the year. And it annoys me that everyone becomes a fan of publicly funded radio for the day. I don’t like
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Is Australia Still Riding On The Sheep’s Back?
31 May 2013

Is Australia Still Riding On The Sheep’s Back?

This article from the May 2013 edition of the IPA Review is written by President of the HR Nicholls Society from 1989 to 2009, Ray Evans. John Macarthur, supported by his wife Elizabeth, is rightly recognised as the father of Australia’s merino wool industry—an industry which made the colony self-supporting and, even before the gold rushes of the 1850s, provided
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Lincoln’s Right-Hand Man
31 May 2013

Lincoln’s Right-Hand Man

This article from the May 2013 edition of the IPA Review is written by Researcher at the IPA, James Bolt. There’s been a rapid comeback for Abraham Lincoln on the pop culture scene. He is in vogue, with Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter depicting his overlooked vigilante days and Steven Spielberg’s recent film which was a relative hit at the Academy
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The Legacy Of The Iron Curtain
31 May 2013

The Legacy Of The Iron Curtain

This article from the May 2013 edition of the IPA Review is written by Director of the Deregulation Unit at the IPA, Alan Moran. Anne Applebaum’s massive study—468 pages plus another 140 pages of notes—analyses the tragic history of Eastern Europe under communism and its post Hitlerian prelude. Her tome delves into the antecedents of the post war communist leadership
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When Everything Was Going Wrong: Britain In The Seventies
31 May 2013

When Everything Was Going Wrong: Britain In The Seventies

This article from the May 2013 edition of the IPA Review is written by Research Fellow at the IPA, Richard Allsop. Almost everything in 1970s Britain seemed to be failing. Its industrial economy was in steep decline, crippled by strikes and excessive wage demands. Inflation peaked at over 30 per cent and unemployment reached its highest level since the War.
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