Daniel Wild Discussing The Failed Energy Transition On The Bolt Report – 27 May 2024

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27 May 2024
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The Institute of Public Affairs’ Daniel Wild was on The Bolt Report to discuss the IPA’s research into climate change and energy.

All media posted onto the IPA website are directly related to the promotion and dissemination of IPA research.

Below is a transcript of the interview.


James Macpherson:

Well, let’s bring in the panel, IPA Deputy Executive Director, Daniel Wild, and history lecturer, Stephen Chavura, co-author of The Forgotten Menzies. Daniel, let me go to you. Are we a racist country?

Daniel Wild:

We’re not a racist country, James. And this tells you everything you need to know about the ABC. It couldn’t be further from the truth. 60 per cent of Australians voted no to the Voice to Parliament, which was to propose to insert race into our Constitution and, as Senator Price just said, would have divided our nation. I saw that Tanya Plibersek was on the media earlier today, and even she rejected the ABC’s claims that we’re a racist country, saying quite rightly that her parents came here after World War II as migrants and were able to build a better life for themselves. And that’s the experience of millions of migrants who have come to our shores.

And look, mainstream Australians have just had an absolute gut-full of these elites, whether they’re in the media or in the corporates or in the sporting bodies, who keep deriding our nation as racist. It’s time for them to move beyond that and to understand that our nation is based on egalitarianism and tolerance and fairness, because that’s what Australians believe.

James Macpherson:

Well, Stephen, this brings to light the concerns about ABC’s bias, and especially the fact, we as taxpayers, we’re lining Laura Tingle’s pockets for her to turn around and brand us all racists.

Stephen Chavura:

That’s right. And this is just demonstrative of the ABC’s contempt for the ordinary Australian. Because I would like to ask Ms. Tingle this, is she confessing to being a racist? Is she accusing her family of being racist? Is she accusing her colleagues at the ABC of being racist? No, she’s not. She’s talking about ordinary Australians who actually live with a lot of these migrants. This is her basket of deplorables moment, and it’s just typical of the ABC’s contempt for everyday Australians.

James Macpherson:

Yeah, I think your point is well-made. All Australians are racist other than those at the Sydney Writers’ Festival.

Stephen Chavura:

That’s right. Yeah.

James Macpherson:

Obviously. Now, Laura Tingle wasn’t the only one to rant and rave at the Writers’ Festival. Ticket holders were also treated to a tirade from The Guardian’s Political reporter, Amy Remeikis. Now, to huge applause, she told the audience that if they didn’t vote appropriately at the next election, quote, “I will come to every single one of your houses and yell out over your kitchen tables, because for God’s sake, this is the only thing that matters.” Now, Remeikis also had a go at Dutton over his nuclear energy policy, calling it a dead cat. And then for good measure, she told the audience that passengers aboard a recent Singapore Airlines flight that encountered turbulence were victims of climate change.

Daniel, this Writers’ Festival is of course funded by taxpayers, partly at least. Why are we paying for this?

Daniel Wild:

Well, that’s a good question, James. Where do you start with all of that? I mean, the most interesting part to me was about the so-called energy transition and Amy’s claim that this push for nuclear is just to stop renewables being rolled out. Well, the transition’s not happening. It’s not working. I’m talking to you from Mudgee, James. Well, we’ve been talking to local farmers and landowners in and around the area, such as Wellington, where there’s these wind turbines and solar panels that are dividing the community. They’re ruining prime agricultural farmland, which is a threat to our food security. It’s pitted neighbour against neighbour. We’ve heard from locals about how these rapacious renewable energy companies are coming onto their land without permission. They’re given false information under false pretences. Amy needs to come out here and to other parts of regional Australia that are bearing the brunt of the so-called energy transition.

All you have to do is look at your energy bills to understand that net-zero doesn’t work. Even the New South Wales Labour government have admitted it doesn’t work, by handing out taxpayer dollars to keep the coal-fired power stations open. So let’s have a proper debate and come out into the regions and talk to the people who know about it.

James Macpherson:

Well, Stephen, all of this exposes the broader problem. It’s not just the ABC, is it? Mainstream media has incredible bias. Although, Anthony Albanese of course had a win saying that some sections of the media are cheerleading for the coalition. But typically, that’s not the case.

Stephen Chavura:

Not at all. In fact, when she said she’ll come over to our houses, had she just been watching Aunty Jack or something like that? It sort of reminded me of that. But when she talks about holding politicians to account, what she doesn’t mean, for example, is holding them to account on immigration policy. Because if you do that, you’re a racist. Not holding them to account on suicidal energy policies, not account on that. Holding them to account on support of Palestine over Israel, nothing like that. It’s holding them to account on a left-wing ideology that most journalists themselves don’t hold to account, they just accept.

James Macpherson:

Yeah. Very good. Well, let me ask you about American politics just for a second. Hillary Clinton is still crying over her 2016 election loss. She’s blamed Russia, she’s blamed the FBI, she’s blamed misogyny, she’s blamed the media. And now, can you believe it, she’s blaming women. Hillary has said women were to blame for her defeat, claiming they abandoned her for not being perfect. She told The Times, “They left me because they just couldn’t take a risk on me, because as a woman, I’m supposed to be perfect. They were willing to take a risk on Trump because he was a man and they could envisage a man as President and Commander in Chief.”

Daniel, the 2016 election was eight long years ago. What’s wrong with Hillary Clinton?

Daniel Wild:

Well, it’s just excuse after excuse. And to me, it shows a lot about the elites, James, which is that they’re not interested in trying to understand or learn about why Trump won. There’s millions of Americans who are unhappy with the political establishment, both the traditional Republican and Democrat establishment. Many have been left behind by economic policies, social policies, immigration policies, energy policies, and foreign policy, and Trump provided an alternative. And as you know, many Democrats decided to vote for Trump for the first time on that basis.

So look, the elites need to spend less time coming up with excuses for why they lost and more time trying to understand the ordinary citizens of their country to learn about what’s happening on the ground.

James Macpherson:

Yeah, good point. Stephen, these claims from Hillary Clinton, she made them while promoting a novel that she’s written. It’s called Terror State. Who’s going to read a novel by Hillary Clinton?

Stephen Chavura:

Probably not even Bill, I would imagine. I mean, why did Hillary lose? Because Hillary is not an ordinary woman. She can connect very well with elites. She found it impossible to connect with just ordinary people, male and female, and her crimes were committed while she was in office. I mean, all of Trump’s sins were committed outside of office. He’d never been in office. People knew that she had done illegal things. And there was also the question of Bill Clinton and several very credible rape allegations against him. Women paid attention to all of this and to, again, allegations of his alleged victims against her for trying to silence them. She could not connect with the ordinary person or the ordinary woman, and that’s why she lost.

James Macpherson:

Well, she’s still crying about it, and I dare say eight years from now, she’ll still be crying. Stephen Chavura, Daniel Wild thank you for joining me.

This transcript from Credlin Sky News Australia from 27 May 2024 has been edited for clarity.

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