IPA Review Articles

10 February 2016

Healthy competition Is Good For Children

‘It doesn’t matter whether you win or lose, only that you tried and did your best.’ This is often said to help children come to terms with suffering a defeat of some sort. In fact, this valuable lesson only applies where competition exists. Competition breeds excellence and cultivates cooperation, but today there is no top of the class. Scores are
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24 January 2016

New Australia Day Poll: We Love Australia

A new poll conducted exclusively for the free market think tank the Institute of Public Affairs shows Australians hold overwhelmingly patriotic views. The poll was featured in the Herald Sun this morning. “Australia is a great country – and Australians agree. They are proud to be Australian, proud of our past and love celebrating Australia Day,” says James Paterson, Deputy Executive Director
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Driving A Soft Bargain
15 December 2015

Driving A Soft Bargain

All current Australian Public Service Enterprise Agreements have a nominal expiry date of 30 June 2014, and are currently in the bargaining stage for the next suite of agreements. This report examines the APS Agreements of the Top 10 Commonwealth government Agencies or Departments by employee size. The APS Agreements provide that general salary levels for APS-level employees will incrementally
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11 December 2015

Innovation Statement? The Government Doesn’t Even Allow Lemonade Stands

The story of what happened to Chelsea-lee Downes reveals everything that’s wrong with Australia’s attitude to innovation and risk-taking. Malcolm Turnbull and Chris Pyne’s Innovation Statement released on Monday is a good start. Less important than the statement’s billion dollars of handouts is its recognition that our attitude to innovation must change. And of course, the biggest source of opposition
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Lessons From Private Cities
10 December 2015

Lessons From Private Cities

Cities are complex creatures in constant flux. Some cities grow and thrive, while others wither and die. A tussle between top-down regulation (by governments) and bottom-up decision-making (by individuals) makes cities difficult to plan. City planners successfully navigate these uncertain waters by accounting for future contingencies and enabling flexibility for bottom-up innovation. A radically new type of city planning focuses
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5 December 2015

The Case for Personal Income Taxation Cuts

Tax reform would benefit by following one simple motif: don’t tax what you want more of. It follows that cutting income tax rates should be a boon for the Australian economy-freeing up labour markets, incentivising work, and stimulating entrepreneurship. If only politics were that simple. With tax reform on the agenda, and at a time when Australia faces some of
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UN Sustainable Development Goals Won’t Help The Poor
6 October 2015

UN Sustainable Development Goals Won’t Help The Poor

The UN ratified its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) a month ago. $US2.5 trillion of foreign aid spending between 2015 and 2030 will be devoted to achieving them. UN Secretary-General Ban-Ki Moon says they are a plan “for ending poverty in all its dimensions, irreversibly, everywhere, and leaving no one behind”. He is wrong. The SDGs are inefficient, driven by politics
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Book Review: Free Speech Lost In Traslation
10 September 2015

Book Review: Free Speech Lost In Traslation

Chris Berg on Flemming Rose’s ‘controversial’ stand for free speech   Ten years ago in September 2005, the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten published twelve cartoons and sparked what the Danish prime minister described as the worst crisis in Danish foreign policy since the Second World War. In his book, The Tyranny of Silence: How One Cartoon Ignited A Global Debate on
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Book Review: Breathing In Freedom
10 September 2015

Book Review: Breathing In Freedom

The last few years has borne witness to an extraordinary growth in government activities. Fiscal stimulus spending, the ramping up of public debt, untrammelled increases in regulation affecting factor and product markets, and the burgeoning growth of the national security apparatus have made us feel less happy, less prosperous, and less safe. If there is any consolation—if not a silver
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17 July 2015

The End Of History…

Undergraduate history degrees in Australia fail to teach fundamental aspects of Australia’s history and how Australian liberal democracy came to be. Instead, they offer a range of disconnected subjects on narrow themes and issues—focusing on imperialism, popular culture, film studies, and ethnic/race history. This report contains the results of a systematic review of the 739 history subjects offered across 34
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