PUBLICATIONS

27 October 2016

Submission To The Royal Commission Into The Protection And Detention Of Children In The Northern Territory

The central contention of this submission is that while there is rightly significant community concern about the operation of youth justice facilities in the Northern Territory, this concern should not be used to indict the entire youth justice system in the Territory. Underlying the problems affecting these facilities are social, economic, and cultural factors that better explain the unique aspects
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IPA Report On The $1.2bn Economic Cost Of Green Lawfare
27 October 2016

IPA Report On The $1.2bn Economic Cost Of Green Lawfare

The IPA’s recent report on how section 487 of the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act1999 enables environmental activists to hurt development and job creation, was featured on the front page of The Australian today:  Environmental groups’ legal challenges to development projects ranging from dams and roads to coalmines are estimated to have cost the economy up to $1.2 billion — an amount
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26 October 2016

Submission To The Inquiry Into The impact Of The Government’s Workplace Bargaining Policy

Enterprise bargaining requires negotiation from both sides. The government’s policy provides the flexibility for this to occur on the employer side. This is in stark contrast to the public sector unions’ bargaining policy, which, as the IPA understands, has objected to every single proposed APS agreement – including those agreements which have ultimately resulted in approval from employees. The IPA’s
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South Australia’s New Home Detention Laws Should Not Be About Coddling Criminals
21 October 2016

South Australia’s New Home Detention Laws Should Not Be About Coddling Criminals

Lindsay Bassani, a former Education Department bureaucrat and football coach, was sentenced to home detention after stealing almost $10,000 from the South Australian Aboriginal Sports Training Academy. Despite being allowed to avoid prison, he is now complaining about his electronic tracking bracelet because of the stigma of being seen with it. The fact that Mr Bassani is complaining is a
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Malcolm Turnbull Must Ignore The Luvvies – He Leads A Centre-Right Party
21 October 2016

Malcolm Turnbull Must Ignore The Luvvies – He Leads A Centre-Right Party

Tony Abbott is right. Australians are sick of the revolving door of prime ministers. As Abbott said on Wednesday, there’s not going to be a change in the Liberal leadership “any time soon”. Liberal MPs are still too bruised by last year’s leadership contest and a close-run election to contemplate either going back to Abbott, or moving to the next
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Je Suis Bill Leak
20 October 2016

Je Suis Bill Leak

The idea that a cartoonist should be answerable to a government body for making a political point is yet another low in the use of Section 18C of Australia’s Racial Discrimination Act. 18C makes it unlawful to ‘offend, insult, humiliate or intimidate’ on the basis of race or ethnicity. It’s under 18C that columnist Andrew Bolt has had two articles
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Section 18C Must Go As It Curbs Freedom Of Speech
14 October 2016

Section 18C Must Go As It Curbs Freedom Of Speech

Freedom of speech is meaningless if all it entails is the liberty to express opinions approved by the state. Freedom of speech is richer than that. It’s a fundamental human right – which is also vital to the proper operation of a functioning liberal democracy – that is breached whenever the state ­places restrictions upon it. Section 18C is a
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Union Bully Busting: FU To The UFU
14 October 2016

Union Bully Busting: FU To The UFU

Voters in the ACT have a stark choice this weekend: Jeremy Hanson and the Canberra Liberals, or four more years of a government notoriously beholden to trade unions (even by Labor standards). Canberrans only have to look south to see what a union-dominated government looks like. Victoria’s situation is so dire that Metropolitan Fire Brigade chief Peter Rau resigned recently
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Blue Poles: Sell This Monument To Madness
14 October 2016

Blue Poles: Sell This Monument To Madness

Jackson Pollock’s Blue Poles must be sold. Not because it’s a bad painting or because it fails the Australian test, but because it of what has come to represent to the Left. Last week, Senator James Paterson suggested that the painting, currently on loan to the Royal Academy of Arts in London, should be sold to the highest bidder in
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After Brexit, Anglo-Oz Relations Can Flourish
12 October 2016

After Brexit, Anglo-Oz Relations Can Flourish

Australia’s cultural, social and political history is entwined with Britain’s. We share a language, the Westminster democratic system, the common law and a respect for diversity, individualism and freedom. Australia’s modern incarnation was defined by British colonisation. As former Australian prime minister Tony Abbott put it last week, during a discussion of Anglo-Australian trade relations at the UK Conservative Party
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