IPA Review Articles

Wherefore art thou, Alan?
3 June 2024

Wherefore art thou, Alan?

IPA Review – Autumn 2024

If there’s one thing more perplexing than sports stars telling us what to think about the great moral issues of the day, it has to be virtue signalling by those in the arts. At least those in professional sports are gainfully employed. But those in the arts who preach at us do so on our dime. Dozens of theatre, dance,
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Don’t Turn Your Back
3 June 2024

Don’t Turn Your Back

IPA Review – Autumn 2024

An impressive new study of Captain Cook helps counter the revisionists who are cooking our history books, writes IPA Office Administrator Claire Peter-Budge. Back in June last year I was invited to host the launch of Christopher Heathcote’s book The Compassion of Captain Cook. In opening the event, I decided to reflect on my own education, which while not that
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Missions In Malawi
3 June 2024

Missions In Malawi

IPA Review – Autumn 2024

A new book about Malawi, its people and their onetime dictator, Hastings Kamuzu Banda, is at heart a classical tragedy, writes IPA Communications Manager Michael Barrett. Much like the opera house in Manaus, Brazil, a Renaissance Revival masterpiece in the middle of the Amazon rainforest, Malawi’s Kamuzu Academy is a most improbable building. Established in 1981 to educate the African
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Why Tim Winton Is Streets Ahead
3 June 2024

Why Tim Winton Is Streets Ahead

IPA Review – Autumn 2024

Tim Winton’s Cloudstreet fully deserves its place in the IPA’s Australian Canon, argues literary critic PETER CRAVEN. There is a strong case for seeing Cloudstreet (1991) as the greatest novel of its period, perhaps indeed since the death of Patrick White. When the famously astute and none-too-easily pleased English novelist Philip Hensher was asked what contemporary novel he would like
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How Science Went Down The Drain
3 June 2024

How Science Went Down The Drain

IPA Review – Autumn 2024

The ‘bootleggers and baptists coalition’ theory helps explain how climate hysteria spread like a pandemic, writes Professor Emeritus of Government Aynsley Kellow. Yes, it’s true that the globe is warming, and that humans are exerting a warming influence upon it. But beyond that—to paraphrase the classic movie The Princess Bride: “I do not think ‘The Science’ says what you think
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Liberalism To The Barricades, Again
3 June 2024

Liberalism To The Barricades, Again

IPA Review – Autumn 2024

The start and finish of liberalism’s golden age is captured in books by Christopher Clark and John Gray, but Jordan Peterson’s ARC seeks to write the next chapter, argues IPA executive director Scott Hargreaves. The story of the rise and fall of liberalism—and what might come next—can be found in two recent books and also in one critical new creation,
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Hungary For More
10 May 2024

Hungary For More

IPA Review – Autumn 2024

Demographic lessons from Hungary and Japan suggest Australia’s way forward must value family and productivity alike, write IPA Research Fellows Brianna McKee and Lana Starkey. Japan’s economy is no longer the world’s third largest, after the country slipped into a recession late last year and fell to fourth spot behind Germany. In what could now be considered an ominous parliamentary
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Without AI, The Forecast Is Grim
10 May 2024

Without AI, The Forecast Is Grim

IPA Review – Autumn 2024

The Bureau of Meteorology’s refusal to explore advanced forecasting technologies is putting Australians at risk while stoking climate change paranoia, argues IPA Senior Fellow Jennifer Marohasy. Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) is ignoring more reliable new weather forecasting techniques in favour of old models. The consequences have been catastrophic for many Australians, perhaps none more so than the residents of
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Argentina’s Trump Card?
10 May 2024

Argentina’s Trump Card?

IPA Review – Autumn 2024

All eyes are on Argentina since the election of an eccentric libertarian as the beleaguered nation’s President, writes economics consultant Andrew Russell. For libertarians, endlessly frustrated at how rarely people of their ideological inclination actually get elected, Javier Milei’s recent victory in Argentina’s Presidential election has given them a chance to finally see what having one of their own with
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Bite Your Tongue
10 May 2024

Bite Your Tongue

IPA Review – Autumn 2024

British academic Doug Stokes’ latest book suggests the decolonisation movement makes itself look ridiculous by poking its tongue out at the West, writes IPA Research Fellow Lana Starkey. Writing in The Nation in 1997, American author and political activist Barbara Ehrenreich and then ethnology graduate student Janet McIntosh relayed social psychologist Phoebe Ellsworth’s recent experience at an interdisciplinary seminar on
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