Zachary Gorman

Dr Zachary Gorman was a Research Fellow and later an Adjunct Fellow  at the Institute of Public Affairs. He is a professional historian with a PhD from the University of Wollongong where he worked as a Tutor of history and politics, and a BA with honours first class from the University of Sydney.

In 2021 he was appointed the Academic Coordinator at the Robert Menzies Institute.

Zachary's research interest is on the origins of the classical liberal tradition both within Australia and in a wider Western context. He has been published in Quadrant, History Australia, the Journal of Australian Colonial History and the Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History. He wrote a chapter on George Reid in Gregory Melleuish's Liberalism and Conservatism and has also appeared on ABC Radio National.

Zachary is the author of Sir Joseph Carruthers: Founder of the New South Wales Liberal Party, published by Connor Court in 2018. The book is a biographical exploration of classical liberalism's impact on the Australian party system and how the term 'liberal' came to be associated with the right in Australian politics.

As a resident Research Fellow with the IPA's Foundations of Western Civilisation program (2018-2020) he explored the antecedents and impact of Magna Carta, trying to contextualise the famous document within a wider tradition of attempts to limit the power of potentially despotic governments.

The result is Summoning Magna Carta: Freedom's Symbol Over a Millennium, published in 2021 by the IPA in conjunction with Australian Scholarly Publishing, available here.

Ban On Mayoral Medals Reveals A Chain Of Fools
13 September 2019

Ban On Mayoral Medals Reveals A Chain Of Fools

Clover Moore’s decision to stop wearing the City of Sydney’s historic mayoral chains is based on ignorance. Not just the ignorance of wearing a symbolic outfit for fifteen years before suddenly deciding that it was racist, but a more pervasive problem of Australians completely failing to understand their history. The Lord Mayor claims that the motto “I take but I
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Fathers of Our Constitutional Inheritance
1 June 2019

Fathers of Our Constitutional Inheritance

Australia’s successful constitution is a combination of a written document and an unwritten parliamentary system based on custom and precedent imported from Britain. This series documents how that system evolved by examining ten of the most important fathers of our constitutional inheritance. Each piece succinctly explores both the life and significance of a subject, directing those interested towards further study.
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On A Giant’s Shoulders
29 April 2019

On A Giant’s Shoulders

When one hears about the development of the principles of liberty, the story generally begins with the ancient Greeks who invented philosophy and democracy, and then moves on to the Romans with their finely balanced republic. After that we enter the Dark Ages, and with the exception of Magna Carta in the 13th century, nothing happens until the Renaissance of
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Fathers of our Constitutional Inheritance
1 April 2019

Fathers of our Constitutional Inheritance

Australia’s successful constitution is a combination of a written document and an unwritten parliamentary system based on custom and precedent imported from Britain. This series – first published by the IPA in late 2018 – documents how that system evolved by examining ten of the most important fathers of our constitutional inheritance. Each piece succinctly explores both the life and
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The Swan River colony and the birth of Australian liberalism
27 March 2019

The Swan River colony and the birth of Australian liberalism

On Saturday, March 19th, 2019, Dr Zachary Gorman, IPA Research Fellow, delivered a speech on liberalism in Western Australia at LibertyFest, held in Perth, WA. The speech follows below. At last year’s Freidman conference in Sydney I delivered a speech on the history of Australian liberalism. It was for the most part well received, but even in front of a
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Rediscovering Australian Liberalism
10 August 2018

Rediscovering Australian Liberalism

Liberalism in Australia has a proud, much older history than the Liberal Party, writes Zachary Gorman.* There is a common misconception that the liberal movement in Australia essentially began with the creation of the modern Liberal Party in 1944. This is far from the case. For much of the 19th century, Australian politics was defined by liberalism. The philosophy was
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