Sinclair Davidson

Adjunct Fellow

Immigrants Boost The Economy And Should Be Welcomed
24 February 2017

Immigrants Boost The Economy And Should Be Welcomed

Populism is being mainstreamed in Australia. At a book launch former prime minister Tony Abbott set out an aggressive populist agenda for Australia – presumably a second Abbott government. Abolish the renewable energy target, abolish the Human Rights Commission, cut spending, reform the Senate, and cut immigration. This from a man who couldn’t amend a single section of the Racial
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IMF Report Shows Old-Time Fiscal Religion Is Needed To Counter The New Mediocre
20 February 2017

IMF Report Shows Old-Time Fiscal Religion Is Needed To Counter The New Mediocre

The latest annual IMF Australia Consultation might have passed unnoticed but for this highly damning statement: “the new mediocre”. Perhaps they were being polite – Australia’s lacklustre fiscal performance has become the new normal or just mediocre. There is nothing new about the increasing debt and ongoing deficits we have experienced since the Rudd government panicked in 2008 and went
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Stop This Greed
30 January 2017

Stop This Greed

This paper is a critique of the political claims which have accompanied the debate about multinational tax avoidance, both at the OECD and within Australia. The movement within Australia provides an example of domestic policymakers adapting arguments pushed by international bodies to fit local political agendas. Australia provides a useful example for two reasons. First, Australia’s leaders used its presidency
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More Of The Same Is Not Good Enough
21 December 2016

More Of The Same Is Not Good Enough

Despite four prime ministers and four treasurers since 2013, Australia’s budget situation has not improved. Only Chris Bowen has no case to answer as his time as treasurer was too short for any serious budget repair work to have been attempted. It was the then prime minister Kevin Rudd who initially unleashed the spending and Julia Gillard who added fuel.
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Natural Resistance
1 December 2016

Natural Resistance

Once there was a product so injurious to public health that it required special government legislation to deal with it. Government officials were convinced that fully informed consumers would make different choices, so they forced manufacturers to use unattractive packaging with restrictions on labels and colours that might entice buyers. The product was margarine. It all started in France in
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What Is The Meaning Of Andrew Leigh’s Pay Cut?
26 July 2016

What Is The Meaning Of Andrew Leigh’s Pay Cut?

Word is that all Labor MPs have to be a member of a trade union. It is surprising then that Andrew Leigh’s union haven’t been knocking on Bill Shorten’s door. Perhaps they are planning a picket for the first day of parliament. Andrew Leigh has just had to accept a $40,000 pay cut while remaining in the Labor shadow cabinet
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What Politicians Need To Know About Negative Gearing
20 February 2016

What Politicians Need To Know About Negative Gearing

• Low and middle income earners benefit most from negative gearing. To abolish negative gearing would make investment more difficult for low and middle income earners. • 80 per cent of Australians who utilise negative gearing have an income of under $150,000, and the median income of Australians negatively geared is $88,751. • Changing negative gearing will make it more
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Economics: An Art or a Science?
1 December 2015

Economics: An Art or a Science?

Many of Dani Rodrik’s arguments are standard defences of the economics discipline. What is new is the suggestion that economics can remain a science even if it does not follow the scientific method, explains Sinclair Davidson. Economists get no respect. When our predictions aren’t wrong, our assumptions are fallacious, our views of humanity bleak, or we’re trying to impose our
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Paying Your Way
1 February 2015

Paying Your Way

In the May 2014 budget, the Abbott government proposed a ‘radical’ reform package of the Australian university system. If it were implemented, domestic students would have to pay a greater share of the costs of their own education. Judging from the outraged responses, you might be forgiven for thinking that this represented the end of public higher education as we
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The Corporate Tax Canard?
4 November 2014

The Corporate Tax Canard?

This article from the November 2014 edition of the IPA Review is by Policy Director at the IPA, Chris Berg, and Senior Fellow at the IPA and Professor of Institutional Economics at RMIT University, Sinclair Davidson. Earlier this year Joe Hockey announced that the upcoming G20 meeting, being hosted in Brisbane in November, has a target of an extra two per
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