Mia Schlicht

Research Analyst

Mia Schlicht is a Research Analyst at the Institute of Public Affairs.

Mia is currently studying a Bachelor of Science and a Bachelor of Law (Honours) at Monash University.

Prior to joining the IPA, Mia gained experience working in property law where she developed a keen eye for detail. She now uses these skills to contribute to the research area of criminal justice at the IPA. She has always held an interest in youth justice and has spent time volunteering in the Indigenous community of Bourke working with juvenile offenders to reduce reoffending rates.

Outside of her work, Mia enjoys long distance running with her local club.

Violent Offender Surge Underscores Urgent Need For Criminal Justice Reform
8 February 2024

Violent Offender Surge Underscores Urgent Need For Criminal Justice Reform

“New ABS data again shows that continued increases in violent crime right across the nation will not go away unless political leaders commit to wholesale criminal justice reform focused on preventing crime and keeping communities safe,” said Mia Schlicht, Research Analyst at the Institute of Public Affairs. Released today, the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ latest data detailing recorded crime and
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Crime Is Up And So Is The Cost Of Jailing Criminals
6 February 2024

Crime Is Up And So Is The Cost Of Jailing Criminals

In this article, Research Analyst Mia Schlicht contextualises and disseminates the IPA’s research on criminal justice reform. The duty of our criminal justice system must be to ensure that the community feels safe, is safe, and criminals are effectively punished. Throughout 2023, this was not the reality for many parts of NSW, particularly Sydney, with almost daily reports of violence.
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Productivity Commission Data Confirms Urgent Need For Criminal Justice Reforms
30 January 2024

Productivity Commission Data Confirms Urgent Need For Criminal Justice Reforms

“The Productivity Commission’s latest prisons data demonstrates governments are not solving the crime crisis, but merely spending record levels of taxpayers’ money on a system which is not fit for purpose and in dire need of reform,” said Mia Schlicht, Research Analyst at the Institute of Public Affairs. Released today, the Productivity Commission’s Report on Government Services 2024 reveals that
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Productivity Commission Data Shows Youth Justice Systems Nationwide Are Broken
23 January 2024

Productivity Commission Data Shows Youth Justice Systems Nationwide Are Broken

“Data shows urgent criminal justice reform is needed to ensure low-risk youth offenders are punished in a manner that does not turn them into lifelong and violent offenders,” said Mia Schlicht, Research Analyst at the Institute of Public Affairs. New data from the Productivity Commission reveals the number of young people in detention across Australia has increased for the second
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New ABS Prison Data Shows Why Criminal Justice Reform Urgent
23 November 2023

New ABS Prison Data Shows Why Criminal Justice Reform Urgent

“The latest ABS data shows prison numbers have climbed over the last 12 months, highlighting, yet again, the need for wholesale criminal justice reform, as current policy settings are simply not working or keeping us safe,” said Mia Schlicht, Research Analyst at the Institute of Public Affairs. Data released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics reveals the number of
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Privitisation Reversal Of NSW Prisons Shows Urgent Reform Needed
3 November 2023

Privitisation Reversal Of NSW Prisons Shows Urgent Reform Needed

“The decision to reverse the privatisation of New South Wales prisons should be accompanied with wholesale criminal justice reform focused on reducing the number of non-violent prisoners whose incarceration provides little overall safety benefit,” said Mia Schlicht, Research Analyst at the Institute of Public Affairs. Following an extended period where New South Wales prisons have strained under chronic resourcing and
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Mia Schlicht On Criminal Justice Reform ABC Melbourne – 30 October 2023
30 October 2023

Mia Schlicht On Criminal Justice Reform ABC Melbourne – 30 October 2023

In this interview, Research Analyst Mia Schlicht discusses the need for criminal justice reform and better sentencing options. All media appearances posted onto the IPA website are directly related to the promotion and dissemination of IPA research Below is a transcript of the interview. Ali Moore: I also want to know from you whether you think jail is always the
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Mia Schlicht On Criminal Justice Reform 3AW Melbourne – 30 October 2023
30 October 2023

Mia Schlicht On Criminal Justice Reform 3AW Melbourne – 30 October 2023

In this interview, Research Analyst Mia Schlicht discusses the need for criminal justice reform and better sentencing options. All media appearances posted onto the IPA website are directly related to the promotion and dissemination of IPA research Below is a transcript of the interview. Tom Elliott: All right, so this is an interesting idea for punishing people. Now, former Victorian
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Victorians Could Pay Over $500k For MP’s Crimes. How’s That For Justice?
29 October 2023

Victorians Could Pay Over $500k For MP’s Crimes. How’s That For Justice?

In this article, Research Analyst Mia Schlicht contextualises and disseminates the IPA’s research on criminal justice reform. Former Victorian cabinet minister Russell Northe’s blatant abuse of his position of power, and his betrayal of the public warrants strict punishment. He deserves no special privileges because of his former office. But his sentencing highlights the need for urgent reform from his
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Northe Case Highlights Need For Criminal Justice Reform
26 October 2023

Northe Case Highlights Need For Criminal Justice Reform

“Russell Northe has broken the law, abused his position of power for financial gain and should be punished harshly. However, the punishment should be a severe financial penalty rather than incarceration.” said Mia Schlicht, Research Analyst at the Institute of Public Affairs. On Wednesday, former Victorian State MP Russell Northe was sentenced to 21 months in prison by the Victorian
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