Jennifer Marohasy

Senior Fellow

Jennifer Marohasy is a Senior Fellow with responsibilities for Climate Change in the Research Program at the IPA.

Dr Marohasy has published in prestigious scientific and law journals over the last few years, these have included: Atmospheric Research, Advances in Atmospheric Research, Wetlands Ecology and Management, Human and Ecological Risk Assessment, Public Law Review and Environmental Law and Management. She has also written for various newspapers and magazines including The Australian, The Courier Mail, The Herald Sun, and for ten years was a fortnightly columnist for Fairfax Media’s rural flagship, The Land. Dr Marohasy remains a regular contributor to e-journal On Line Opinion.

Dr Marohasy first worked for the IPA between 2003 and 2009; writing a seminal paper that showed rising-salinity in the Murray River was contrived – a product of computer modelling. Actual salinity levels had been falling for over 20-years as a consequence of successful government-sponsored drainage management programs in irrigations areas.

Between 2009 and 2015 Dr Marohasy was involved with various university research programs. Her re-appointment at the IPA in August 2015 followed the termination of an adjunct position at Central Queensland University following the ousting of Bjorn Lomborg from the University of Western Australia. Her work at CQU was wholly funded by the B. Macfie Family Foundation, and this continues to be the source of funding for her employment at the IPA.

Dr Marohasy describes herself as a utilitarian libertarian: she much prefers appeals to reason, logic and evidence over authority and consensus.

Your Dinner Party Survival Guide
1 November 2016

Your Dinner Party Survival Guide

There are certain things best not discussed at dinner parties and gatherings of the extended family. This list used to only include religion, sex and politics. More recently ‘climate change’ has become a sensitive issue. At the same time climate change is more likely to be included in a church sermon—indeed, while once considered the concern of scientific institutions, climate
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Brian Cox Confused On More Than Global Temperatures
18 August 2016

Brian Cox Confused On More Than Global Temperatures

Celebrity physicist Brian Cox misled the ABC TV Q&A audience on at least 3 points-of-fact on Monday night. This is typical of the direction that much of science is taking. Richard Horton, the current editor of the medical journal, The Lancet, recently stated that, “The case against science is straightforward: much of the scientific literature, perhaps half, may simply be
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The Black Swan of the Murray-Darling Basin Plan
1 April 2016

The Black Swan of the Murray-Darling Basin Plan

A ‘black swan event’ refers to the unprecedented— something that changes how we previously perceived reality. The Murray-Darling Basin is a place replete with black swans (both figuratively and literally), particularly the Lower Lakes, Coorong and the Murray Mouth. Over 4,000 black swans were counted in a bird census of the Lower Lakes in January 2011, and there are oft
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10 March 2014

Climate Change – The Facts 2014

Australia needs an honest debate about the facts of climate change. Governments around the world are preparing to dramatically increase taxes, regulate energy supplies and limit individual choices to deal with climate change. But what do we really know about the science of climate change? Is climate change caused by humans? Is it new? Is there a “scientific consensus”? Is
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Competition In Climate Science
22 November 2013

Competition In Climate Science

This article from the November 2013 edition of the IPA Review is by Adjunct Research Fellow at Central Queensland University, Dr Jennifer Marohasy and Professorial Research Fellow at Central Queensland University, Dr John Abbot. The classical liberal, like the ordinary Australian, has a general aversion to revolutionary change. This is justified in the spheres of politics and economics. When it
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Politics and the Environment in Indonesia
30 July 2007

Politics and the Environment in Indonesia

In North Queensland, environmental activists occasionally hold up a prop such as a dead fish, to illustrate a point and provide television footage of an alleged incidence of pollution. In Indonesia, in the recent campaign to jail Richard Ness, activists used as their icon a dead baby. Richard Ness, President of an Indonesian subsidiary of Newmont Mining Corporation, was accused
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