Chris Berg

Adjunct Fellow

Chris Berg was a fellow and policy director with the Institute of Public Affairs between 2004 and 2017. He was an adjunct fellow with the Institute of Public Affairs between 2017 and 2020.
Visit his website at chrisberg.org

Is Reform Hopeless In An Era Of Disillusion?
29 August 2016

Is Reform Hopeless In An Era Of Disillusion?

Around 23 per cent of Australians gave their primary vote to minor parties and independents at the July federal election. This is the highest number since the formation of the Liberal Party and the three party system at the end of the Second World War. When political historians look back on our era it is unlikely they will focus on
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Is Reform Hopeless In An Era Of Disillusion? The Degraded Trust Between Voters And Their Representatives Has Serious Economic Consequences
20 August 2016

Is Reform Hopeless In An Era Of Disillusion? The Degraded Trust Between Voters And Their Representatives Has Serious Economic Consequences

Around 23 per cent of Australians gave their primary vote to minor parties and independents at the July federal election. This is the highest number since the formation of the Liberal Party and the three party system at the end of the Second World War. When political historians look back on our era it is unlikely they will focus on
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19 August 2016

Submission To The Productivity Commission Draft Report Of The Regulation Of Agriculture

The Institute of Public Affairs (IPA) welcomes this Productivity Commission Draft report (henceforth the ‘Draft’) on the Regulation of Agriculture and encourages the focus on the impact of regulation and red tape on this primary industry. While Australian agricultural production is expected to rise to over $60 billion for the first time this financial year, productivity and competitiveness headwinds remain.
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5 August 2016

10 Worst Nanny State Policies

10: Plain packet cigarettes The argument for plain cigarette packaging is one of the most stark examples of how Nanny State regulations treat individuals as childish automatons. Plain packaging involves the complete removal of any brand logos, special colours or fonts, pictures or any other unique packaging design, to be replaced by only the brand name in a mandatory font,
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Brexit and the Red Tape State
1 August 2016

Brexit and the Red Tape State

The unexpected success of Brexit and the policy possibilities of Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union raises what might be the most important question of the twenty-first century: can the red tape state be unwound? The original idea behind European unity was a free trade area that would prevent the outbreak of a future continental war through commerce and diplomacy.
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Populism Is Not A Dirty Word
10 July 2016

Populism Is Not A Dirty Word

The political news right now is Malcolm Turnbull’s tenuous hold on government. But tight elections aren’t unusual. The real significance of the 2016 election is how it reveals the growing dissatisfaction with the political class and mainstream parties. This is a thread that links the support for Nick Xenophon and Pauline Hanson in Australia with the support for Donald Trump
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The Libertarian Alternative
2 May 2016

The Libertarian Alternative

Libertarianism – the philosophy of government that pairs free market economics with social liberalism – presents a vigorous challenge and viable political alternative to the old Left-Right partisan shouting match. Libertarianism offers surprising new solutions to stagnant policy debates over issues such as immigration and civil rights, and provokes a framework for tackling contemporary problems like privacy, the environment and
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Cigars and the Plain Packaging Effect
1 April 2016

Cigars and the Plain Packaging Effect

In the 176 page report into smoking produced by the Preventative Health Taskforce—which Labor used as a blueprint for plain packaging— cigars are mentioned just twice. Once, buried in a footnote to a graph showing declining smoking rates across blue and white collar groups; and once in a piece of draft legislation written not for Australia, but for the United
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How to be a Thoroughly Liberal Government
1 December 2015

How to be a Thoroughly Liberal Government

On Saturday 10 April 1954, Robert Menzies gave an after dinner speech to the Institute of Public Affairs. The event was a private one, held in Melbourne, and Menzies relished what he thought would be the ‘last opportunity’ to speak in ‘a humane and civilised fashion about the issues before this country’ before election day, which had been set for
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Book Review: Free Speech Lost In Traslation
10 September 2015

Book Review: Free Speech Lost In Traslation

Chris Berg on Flemming Rose’s ‘controversial’ stand for free speech   Ten years ago in September 2005, the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten published twelve cartoons and sparked what the Danish prime minister described as the worst crisis in Danish foreign policy since the Second World War. In his book, The Tyranny of Silence: How One Cartoon Ignited A Global Debate on
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