Aynsley Kellow

Professor Emeritus of Government, University of Tasmania

Aynsley Kellow is Professor Emeritus of Government, University of Tasmania, and a Special Correspondent for the Institute of Public Affairs on COP26 and Net Zero.

Kellow How Science Went Down The Drain – References
25 March 2024

Kellow How Science Went Down The Drain – References

Alexander, R B 2022, ‘Chinese Whispers: How Climate Science Gets Lost in Translation.’ Note 37. Global Warming Policy Foundation, London. Alimonti, G & L Mariani 2023, ‘Is the number of global natural disasters increasing?’ Environmental Hazards, 1-17. Arrhenius, S 1896, ‘On the Influence of Carbonic Acid in the Air upon the Temperature of the Ground.’ Philosophical Magazine and Journal of
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Taking Stock
22 December 2022

Taking Stock

Taking the Global Methane Pledge will harm Australia’s economy and have no impact on climate change, argues Professor Emeritus of Government Aynsley Kellow. I recently described climate policy by drawing on Scottish author Charles Mackay’s 1841 essay Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, the title of which should give you the idea. The delusion seems to continue after
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Globe Trotters
21 January 2022

Globe Trotters

The 400 private jets used to ferry participants to a conference on reducing emissions symbolise how international climate policy is made, argues Professor Emeritus of Government Aynsley Kellow. The 26th Conference of the Parties (COP26), held recently at Glasgow, highlighted many of the worst aspects of how international climate science and policy occurs. Close analysis also displays the extremely dubious
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Dateline Glasgow: the real costs of renewable energy
2 November 2021

Dateline Glasgow: the real costs of renewable energy

Australia has an embarrassment of riches. It possesses vast resources of high quality coal, both coking coal (for iron ore production) and steaming coal (for energy production), with low sulphur and low ash. Much of it can be mined at low cost by open cut methods. This endowment has become an embarrassment because coal combustion gives rise to the emission of the highest levels of CO2 of all the fossil fuels. Australia exports both large quantities of coal and of energy-intensive products like aluminium, so that emissions occur here rather than in consuming nations.
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